Thursday, February 7, 2013

The Cast Iron Skillet: It's not just a weapon {GIVEAWAY}

Lodge Round Fry Pan

UPDATE: 2/8: The Winner of the Cast Iron Skillet from Williams Sonoma is APRIL M. from Tulsa!!!

Thank you for entering. Hope it was informative and fun for you to think about changing over from non-stick to cast iron!
XXXOOO
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The day that I moved into my own apartment in Philadelphia, right before my college graduation, my father gave me a cast iron skillet. He intended to provide me with a life long gift to use in my kitchen, but he also was a protective father and believed that I could use it as a weapon if circumstances ever warranted it. {I'm serious, btw}. And this was way before Rapunzel, too.


"We've all seen examples or heard stories about Grandma's cast iron cookware that's been in regular use since the Eisenhower administration or before. Long before nonstick pans (made with perfluorooctanoic Acid-or PFOA-which is a known carcinogen...yum!) became popular, cast iron provided the original nonstick cooking surface, and we've got news for you: it still works! While new nonstick pans' ability to repel sticky foods fades over time (often just a year or two), a well-seasoned cast iron pan will only get better with age, and will last you for a lifetime.
This ultimate longevity is what makes cast iron such a great, green addition to any kitchen (or a great, green cooking option, if you've already got one or more). Imagine never having to replace your cookware again. Ever. While they do require a bit more maintenance than their chemically-enhanced counterparts, it's absolutely worth your while to have a pan or set of pans that will perform at a high level, under a multitude of kitchen scenarios, for you, and, eventually, your kids, and even their kids, too.
The first thing you have to do when you get a new pan is "season" it. Here's how:
1. Wash your new pan in hot, soapy water. This is the only time you'll use soap when washing cast iron, so don't get used to it. Rinse the pan and dry completely. Don't worry, a little discoloration on towel is normal.
2. Apply a thin, even coating of vegetable oil or melted shortening-do not use butter or butter flavored shortening-to the pan with a soft cloth or paper towel. Apply the oil inside and outside. If your utensil has a lid, make sure you season it, as well.
3. Preheat your oven to 350°F. Put the pan on top shelf, upside down. Place some aluminum foil on a baking sheet and put that on the bottom shelf of the oven to catch any drippings. Bake the pan (and lid, if you've got one) in the oven for one hour, then turn the oven off and leave the pan in there until it's cool.
Congratulations! Your pan is now seasoned and ready for use. But it doesn't stop there; you have to give your cookware a little lovin' after each time that you use it. To clean your cookware, after use, use hot water and a plastic (not metal, because it'll scratch off the seasoning ) scrub bun or brush, and clean it while the pan is still hot (but not too hot to touch).
Tip: Do not use soap, unless you are going to repeat the seasoning process, and, whatever you do, don't put it in dishwasher."
So, here is a little give away...
Leave a comment and become a member of Commona-my House and you will be entered to win this Lodge 10" Cast Iron Skillet, from William Sonoma.  {if you are a member already, than you will be entered once for your membership, if you leave a comment you will have two entries}. 
Lodge Round Fry Pan

I'd rather my kids have iron in their scrambled eggs than perfluorooctanoic Acid-or PFOA...and you can always use it as a weapon, right?
XXXOOO.

12 comments:

  1. I love my cast iron skillet!! Its great you can go from stove to oven in the same pan. I big fan!!

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    1. great point, April!!! So many things that our grandma's used and seem 'old fashioned' are just plain smart...this is one of them.

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  2. I have always wanted a cast iron skillet. And thanks for sharing how to care for one. I have always wondered that.

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    1. You'd love them, regardless of all of the other benefits, they cook really well..they get hot quickly and cook evenly. :) thanks for the comment.

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  3. I helped to clean out my Grandparent's home after they passed away, and although my Aunts and female cousins ended up with the nicer items, I got her every day cooking items, i.e. dishes, utensils, glasses, pot... you get the picture. I also picked up a large and small cast iron skillet which must be 60 years old at this point and I love these treasured antiques! She made fried chicken every Sunday, and although I don't use them that often, I do love that I think of her everytime I fry chicken for my family! Cast iron is the best!

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    1. How cool that you have all of your Granparent's every day items... I use mine all the time, and I have to say, mostly in the oven, not as a skillet on the stove top. thanks for sharing and entering the give away!

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  4. I am seriously saving for a good skillet, right NOW! My mom's is the best pan in the house. Great giveaway, friend :)

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    1. It's hard to build up a kitchen..but if you start with good solid pieces then you may find that you really only need about 4 or 5 pans total. Thanks for commenting, and complimenting!

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  5. http://www.ibelieveicanfry.com/2010/12/reconditioning-re-seasoning-cast-iron.html

    You can delete this if you want, but here's an awesome tutorial on how to RECONDITION a really old, nasty skillet, if you find one.

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    1. That IS an awesome tutorial! Thanks, Rebecca! It really is easier than people think. BIG tip that I know has been mentioned a couple times, and it seems weird, but you don't wash cast iron with water, that's what leads to rust. I just wipe mine clean with a paper towel until it is totally sparkling. All of the residue comes right off because of the oil barrier.

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  6. Great information and tutorial! You've convinced me it's time to switch and start cooking with iron. I grew up in a home using cast iron pans, but didn't invest in them myself. Now would be a good time to get a little iron in my life. :) And it doubles as a weapon, wow!

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    1. Yup, benefits all around. Thanks for commenting and for hopping over to read and enter!!! ;)

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